What is holding us back from change?

There are worse spots for a meeting. Oxford. Photo by: S. Mason

Every 3 months the DPOC teams gets together in person in either Oxford, Cambridge or London (there’s also been talk of taking a meeting at Bletchley Park sometime). As this is a collaborative effort, these meetings offer a rare opportunity to work face-to-face instead of via Skype with the endless issues around screen sharing and poor connections. Good ideas come when we get to sit down together.

As our next joint board meeting is next week, it was important to look over the work of the past year and make sure we are happy with the plan for year two. Most importantly, we wanted to discuss the messages we need to give our institutions as we look towards the sustainability of our digital preservation activities. How do we ensure that the earlier work and the work being done by us does not get repeated in 2-5 years time?

Silos in institutions

This is especially complicated when dealing with institutions like Oxford and Cambridge. We are big and old institutions with teams often working in silos. What does siloing have an effect on? Well, everything. Communication, effort, research—it all suffers. Work done previously is done again. Over and over.

The same problems are being tackled within different silos; this is duplicated and wasted effort if they are not communicating their work to each other. This means that digital preservation efforts can be fractured and imbalanced if institutional collaboration is ignored. We have an opportunity and responsibility in this project to get people together and to get them to talk openly about the digital preservation problems they are each trying to tackle.

Managers need to lead the culture change in the institution

While not always the case, it is important that managers do not just sit back and say “you will never get this to work” or “it has always been this way.” We need them on our side; they after often the gatekeepers of silos. We have to bring them together in order to start opening the silos.

It is within their power to be the agents of change; we have to empower them to believe in changing the habits of our institution. They have to believe that digital preservation is worth it if their team will also.

This might be the ‘carrot and stick’ approach or the ‘carrot’ only, but whatever approach is used, the are a number of points we agreed needed to be made clear:

  • our digital collections are significant and we have made assurances about their preservation and long term access
  • our institutional reputation plays a role in the preservation our digital assets
  • digital preservation is a moving target and we must be moving with it
  • digital preservation will not be “solved” through this project, but we can make a start; it is important that this is not then the end.

Roadmap to sustainable digital preservation

Backing up any messages is the need for a sustainable roadmap. If you want change to succeed and if you want digital preservation to be a core activity, then steps must be actionable and incremental. Find out where you are, where you want to go and then outline the timeline of steps it will take to get there. Consider using maturity models to set goals for your roadmap, such as Kenney and McGovern’s, Brown’s or the NDSA model. Each are slightly different and some might be more suitable for your institutions than others, so have a look at all of them.

It’s like climbing a mountain. I don’t look at the peak as I walk; it’s too far away and too unattainable. Instead, I look at my feet and the nearest landmark. Every landmark I pass is a milestone and I turn my attention to the next one. Sometimes I glance up at the peak, still in the distance—over time it starts to grow closer. And eventually, my landmark is the peak.

It’s only when I get to the top that I see all of the other mountains I also have to climb. And so I find my landmarks and continue on. I consider digital preservation a bit of the same thing.

What are your suggestions for breaking down the silos and getting fractured teams to work together? 

Over 20 years of digitization at the Bodleian Libraries

Policy and Planning Fellow Edith writes an update on some of her findings from the DPOC project’s survey of digitized images at the Bodleian Libraries.


During August-December 2016 I have been collating information about Bodleian Libraries’ digitized collections. As an early adopter of digitization technology, Bodleian Libraries have made digital surrogates of its collections available online since the early 1990’s. A particular favourite of mine, and a landmark among the Bodleian Libraries’ early digital projects, is the Toyota Transport Digitization Project (1996). [Still up and running here]

At the time of the Toyota Project, digitization was still highly specialised and the Bodleian Libraries opted to outsource the digital part to Laser Bureau London. Laser Bureau ‘digitilised’ 35mm image negatives supplied by Bodleian Libraries’ imaging studio and sent the files over on a big bundle of CDs. 1244 images all in all – which was a massive achievement at the time. It is staggering to think that we could now produce the same many times over in just a day!

Since the Toyota projects completion twenty years ago, Bodleian Libraries have continued large scale digitization activities in-house via its commercial digitization studio, outsourced to third party suppliers, and in project partnerships. With generous funding from the Polonsky Foundation the Bodleian Libraries are now set to add over half a million image surrogates of Special Collection manuscripts to its image portal – Digital.Bodleian.

What happens to 20 years’ worth of digitized material? Since 1996 both Bodleian Libraries and digitization standards have changed massively. Early challenges around storage alone have meant that content inevitably has been squirreled away in odd locations and created to the varied standards of the time. Profiling our old digitized collections is the first step to figuring out how these can be brought into line with current practice and be made more visible to library users.

“So what is the extent of your content?”, librarians from other organisations have asked me several times over the past few months. In the hope that it will be useful for other organisations trying to profile their legacy digitized collections, I thought I would present some figures here on the DPOC blog.

When tallying up our survey data, I came to a total of approximately 134 million master images in primarily TIFF and JP2 format. From very early digitization projects however, the idea of ‘master files’ was not yet developed and master and access files will, in these cases, often be one and the same.

The largest proportion of content, some 127,000,000 compressed JP2s, were created as part of the Google Books project up to 2009 and are available via Search Oxford Libraries Online. These add up to 45 TB of data. The library further holds three archives of 5.8million/99.4TB digitized image content primarily created by the Bodleian Libraries’ in-house digitization studio in TIFF. These figures does not include back-ups – with which we start getting in to quite big numbers.

Of the remaining 7 million digitized images which are not from the Google Books project, 2,395,000 are currently made available on a Bodleian Libraries website. In total the survey examined content from 40 website applications and 24 exhibition pages. 44% of the images which are made available online were, at the time of the survey, hosted on Digital.Bodleian, 4% on ODL Greenstone and 1% on Luna.The latter two are currently in the processes of being moved onto Digital.Bodleian. At least 6% of  content from the sample was duplicated across multiple website applications and are candidates for deduplication. Another interesting fact from the survey is that JPEG, JP2 (transformed to JPEG on delivery) and GIF are by far the most common access/derivative formats on Bodleian Libraries’ website applications.

The final digitized image survey report has now been reviewed by the Digital Preservation Coalition and is being looked at internally. Stay tuned to hear more in future blog posts!

(Mis)Adventures in guest blogging

Sarah shares her recent DPC guest blogging experience. The post is available to read at: http://www.dpconline.org/blog/beware-of-the-leopard-oxford-s-adventures-in-the-bottom-drawer 


As members of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), we have the opportunity to contribute to their blog on issues in digital preservation. As the Outreach & Training Fellow at Oxford, that tasks falls upon me when its our turn to contribute.

You would think that because I contribute to this blog regularly,  I’d be an old hat at blogging. It turns out that writer’s block can hit at precisely the worst possible time. But, I forced out what I could and then turned to the other Fellows at Oxford for support. Edith and James both added their own work to the post.

With a final draft ready, the day approached when we could submit it to the blog. Even the technically-minded struggled with technology now and again. First, it was the challenge of uploading images—it only took about 2 or 3 tries and then I deleted the evidence mistakes. Finally, I clicked ‘submit’ and waited for confirmation.

And I waited…

And got sent back to the homepage. Then I got a ‘failure notice’ email that said “I’m afraid I wasn’t able to deliver your message to the following addresses. This is a permanent error; I’ve given up. Sorry it didn’t work out.” What just happened? Did it work or not?

So I tried again….

And again…

And again.  I think I submitted 6 more times before I emailed to the DPC to ask what I had done wrong. I had done NOTHING wrong, except press ‘submit’ too much. There were as many copies waiting for approval as there were times when I had hit ‘submit’. There was no way to delete the evidence, so I couldn’t avoid that embarrassment.

Minus those technological snafus, everything worked and the DPOC team’s first guest blog post is live! You can read the post here for an Oxford DPOC project update.

Now that I’ve got my technological mistakes out of the way, I think I’m ready to continue contributing to the wider digital preservation community through guest blogging. We are a growing (but still relatively small) community and sharing our knowledge, ideas and experiences freely through blogs is important. We rely on each other to navigate the field where things can be complex and ever-changing. Journals and project websites date quickly, but community-driven and non-profit blogs remain a good source of relevant and immediate information. They are valuable part of my digital preservation work and I am happy to be giving back.

 

Save Comic Sans

Happy April Fools’ Day! This was the joke post put out by the DPOC team. Though none of the following post is true (Comic Sans is going nowhere so far as we know), it is important to think about the preservation of font files. Ever notice that if a certain font file is not installed in your computer, the certain files can look completely different? Suddenly specialised font files become an important part of the digital file (maintaining its original look and feel) and preserving it becomes important. Just something to think about.


Save Comic Sans!

We were deeply saddened by today’s news that Microsoft Office products will in the future stop supporting the iconic Comic Sans font. The decision comes as a direct reaction to the slow decline in popularity and uptake from the Microsoft user community. The font became a staple in the mid 1990’s, but has seen a back-lash, particularly from the media industry, over the last few years. Repeated ridicule from leading public relation agencies and graphic designers has inevitably led to the drastic response from Microsoft.

‘Ban Comic Sans’, a fanatic society of typographic purists, have after an extensive smear campaign fought over a 15-year period finally won their case. “Clearly, Comic Sans as a voice conveys silliness, childish naiveté, irreverence, and is far too casual[…]”, they comment gleefully following the news from Microsoft Head Office.

(Above: Propaganda spread by the “group” Ban Comic Sans http://bancomicsans.com/propaganda/)

As preservation professionals and historians, we feel that it is our duty to speak up for all the other lovers of the font. Fans who have for years been shamed into silence by the widespread acceptance of these fanatical views. The digital preservation of Comic Sans is not only about safeguarding 20 years of cultural history, but it is also about doing the right thing for our children and grandchildren. As a small tribute, and as a show of our appreciation www.dpoc.ac.uk, will from now on only blog in Comic Sans. We refuse to say RIP to the font – we say it is time to fight the good fight.

If you have an anecdote about a time you enjoyed Comic Sans – please comment below and show your support. Perhaps we can make a difference together.

A view from the basement – a visit the DPC Glasgow

Last Monday, Sarah, Edith and Lee visited the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) at their DPC Glasgow Office on University Gardens. The aim of the visit was to understand how the DPC has and will lend support to the DPOC project. The DPOC team is very fortunate in having the DPC’s expertise, resources and services at their disposal as a supporting partner in the project and we were keen to find out more.

Plied with tea, coffee and Sharon McMeekin’s awesome lemon cake, William Kilbride gave us an overview of the DPC, explaining that that they are not-for-profit membership based organisation who used to mainly cater for the UK and Ireland. However, international agencies are now welcome (UN, NATO, ICC to name a few) and this has changed the nature of their program and the features that they offer (website, streaming, event recording). They are vendor neutral but do have a ‘Commercial Supporter’ community to help support events and raise funds for digital preservation work. They have six members of staff working from the DPC Glasgow and DPC York offices. They focus upon four main areas of:

  • Workforce Development, Training and Skills
  • Communication and Advocacy
  • Research and Practice
  • Partnerships and Sustainability

William explained the last three areas and Sharon gave us an overview of the work that she does for developing workforce skills and offering training events, especially the ‘Getting Started in Digital Preservation’ and ‘Making Progress’ workshops. The DPC also provide Leadership Scholarships to help develop knowledge and CPD in digital preservation, so please do apply for those if you are working somewhere that can spare your time out of the office but can’t fund you.

In terms of helping DPOC, the DPC can help with hosting events (such as PASIG 2017) and provide supporting training resources for our organisations. They can also help with procurement processes, auditing as well as calling on the wealth of advice gained from their six members of staff.

We left feeling that, despite working as a collaborative team with colleagues we can already bounce ideas off, we had a wider support network that we could call on, guide us and help us share our work more widely. From a skills and training perspective, the idea that they are happy to review, comment and suggest further avenues for the skills needs analysis toolkit to ensure it will benefit of the wider community is of tremendous use. Yet this is one such example, and help with procurement, policy development and auditing is also something they are willing to help the project with.

It is reassuring that the DPC are there and have plenty of experience to share in the digital preservation sphere. Tapping into networks, sharing knowledge and collaborating really is the best way to help achieve a coherent, sustainable approach to digital preservation and helps those working in it to focus on specific tasks rather than try and ‘reinvent the wheel’ when somebody else has already spent time on it.

The things we find…

Sarah shares some finds from Edith’s Digitized image survey of the Bodleian Libraries’ many digitization projects and initiatives over the years.


We’ve been digitizing our collections for a long time. And that means we have a lot of things, in a lot of places. Part of the Policy & Planning Fellow’s task is to find them, count them, and make sure we’re looking after them. That includes making decisions to combat the obsolescence of the hardware they are stored on, the software they rely on (this includes the website that has been designed to display them), and the files themselves so they do not become victim to bit rot.

At Oxford, Edith has been hard at work searching, counting, emailing, navigating countless servers and tape managers, and writing up the image survey report. But while she has been hard at work, she has been sharing some of her best finds with the team and I thought it was time we share them with you.

Below are some interesting finds from Edith’s image survey work. Some of them a real gems:

What? a large and apparently hungry dragon from Oracula, folio 021v (Shelfmark: Barocci 170) Found? On the ODL (Oxford Digital Library) site here.

What? Toby the Sapient Pig. Found? On the Bodleian Treasures website. Currently on display in the Treasures gallery at the Weston library and open to the public. The digital version is available 24/7.

What? A very popular and beautiful early manuscript: an illustrated guide to Oxford University and its colleges, prepared for Queen Elizabeth I in 1566. This page is of the Bodleian Libraries’ Divinity School. Found? On the ODL (Oxford Digital Library) site here.

What? Corbyn in the early years (POSTER 1987-23). Found? Part of the CPA Poster Collection here.

What? And this brilliant general election poster (POSTER 1963-04). Found? Part of the CPA Poster Collection here.

What? Cosmographia, 1482, a map of the known World (Auct. P 1.4). Found? In Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts here.

What? Gospels, folio 28v (Auct. D. 2.16). Found? Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts here.

There are just a few of the wonderful and weird finds in our rich and diverse collections. One thing is certain, digitized collections provide hours of discovery to anyone with a computer and Internet access. It is one of the most exciting things about digitization–access to almost anyone, anywhere.

Of course providing access means preserving the digital images. Knowing what we have and where we have it, is one step to ensuring that they will be preserved for future access and discovery of the beautiful, the weird, and the wonderful.

Polonsky Fellows visit Western Bank Library at Sheffield University

Overview of DPOC’s visit to the Western Bank Library at Sheffield University by James Mooney, Technical Fellow at Bodleian Libraries, Oxford.
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The Polonsky Fellows were invited to the Western Bank Library at Sheffield University to speak with Laura Peaurt and other members of the Library. The aim of the meeting was to discuss the experiences of using and implementing Ex Libris’ Rosetta product.

After arriving by train, it was just a quick tram ride to Western Bank campus at Sheffield University, then we had the fun of using the paternoster lift in the Western Bank Library to arrive at our meeting, it’s great to see this technology has been preserved and still in use.

Paternoster lifts still in use at the Western Library. Image Credit: James Mooney

We met with Laura Peaurt (Digital Preservation Manager), Chris Jones (Library Systems Manager) and Angus Taggart (Library Systems Manager – Research).

Andy Bussey, Head of Digital Services & Systems was kind enough to give us an hour of his time at the start of the meeting, allowing us to discuss parts of the procurement and implementation process.

When working out the requirements for the system, Sheffield was able to collaborate with the White Rose University Consortium (the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York) to work out an initial scope.

When reviewing the options both open source and proprietary products were considered. For the Western Library and the University back in 2014, after a skills audit, the open source options had to be ruled out due to a lack of technical and developmental skills to customise or support them. I’m sure if this was revisited today the outcome may well have been different as the team has grown and gained experience and expertise. Many organisations may find it easier to budget for a software package and support contract with a vendor than to pursue the creation of several new employment positions.

With that said, as part of the implementation of Rosetta, Laura’s role was created as there was an obvious need for a Digital Preservation manager, we then went on to discuss the timeframe of the project and then moved onto the configuration of the product with Laura providing a live demonstration of the product whilst talking about the current setup, the scalability of the instances and the granularity of the sections within Rosetta.

During the demonstrations we discussed what content was held in Rosetta, how people had been trained with Rosetta and what feedback they had received so far. We reviewed the associated metadata which had been stored with the items that had been ingested and went over the options regarding integration with a Catalogue and/or Archival Management System.

After lunch we went on discuss the workflows currently being used with further demonstrations so we could see an end-to-end examples including what ingest rules and polices were in place along with what tools were in use and what processes were carried out. We then looked at how problematic items were dealt with in the Technical Analysis Workbench, covering the common issues and how additional steps in the ingest process can minimise certain issues.

As part of reviewing the sections of Rosetta we also inspected of Rosetta’s metadata model, the DNX (Digital Normalised XML) and discussed ingesting born-digital content and associated METS files.

Western Library. Image Credit: A J Buildings Library.

We visited Sheffield with many questions and during the course of the discussions throughout the day many of these were answered but as the day came to a close we had to wrap up the talks and head back to the train station. We all agreed it had been an invaluable meeting and sparked further areas of discussion. Having met face to face and with an understanding of the environment at Sheffield will make future conversations that much easier.

DPOC visits the Wellcome Library in London

A brief summary by Edith Halvarsson, Policy and Planning Fellow at the Bodleian Libraries, of the DPOC project’s recent visit to the Wellcome Library.
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Last Friday the Polonsky Fellows had the pleasure of spending a day with Rioghnach Ahern and David Thompson at the Wellcome Library. With a collection of over 28.6 million digitized images, the Wellcome is a great source of knowledge and experience in working with digitisation at a large scale. Themes of the day centred around pragmatic choices, achieving consistency across time and scale, and horizon scanning for emerging trends.

The morning started with an induction from Christy Henshaw, the Wellcome’s Digital Production Manager. We discussed digitisation collection development and Jpeg2000 profiles, but also future directions for the library’s digitised collection. One point which particularly stood out to me, was changes in user requirements around delivery of digitised collections. The Wellcome has found that researchers are increasingly requesting delivery of material for “use as data”. (As a side note: this is something which the Bodleian Libraries have previously explored in their Blockbooks project, which used facial recognition algorithms traditionally associated with security systems, to trace provenance of dispersed manuscripts). As the possibilities for large scale analysis using these types of algorithms multiply, the Wellcome is considering how delivery will need to change to accommodate new scholarly research methods.

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Brain teaser: Spot the Odd One Out (or is it a trick question?). Image credit: Somaya Langley

Following Christy’s talk we were given a tour of the digitization studios by Laurie Auchterlonie. Laurie was in the process of digitising recipe books for the Wellcome Library’s Recipe Book Project. He told us about some less appetising recipes from the collection (such as three-headed pig soup, and puppy dishes) and about the practical issues of photographing content in a studio located on top of one of the busiest underground lines in London!

After lunch with David and Rioghnach at the staff café, we spent the rest of the afternoon looking at Goobi plug-ins, Preservica and the Wellcome’s hybrid-cloud storage model. Despite talking digitisation – metadata was a reoccurring topic in several of the presentations. Descriptive metadata is particularly challenging to manage as it tends to be a work in progress – always possible to improve and correct. This creates a tension between curators and cataloguers doing their work, and the inclination to store metadata together with digital objects in preservation systems to avoid orphaning files. Wellcome’s solution has been to articulate their three core cataloguing systems as the canonical bibliographic source, while allowing potentially out of data metadata to travel with objects in both Goobi and Preservica for in-house use only. As long as there is clarity around which is the canonical metadata record, these inconsistencies are not problematic to the library. ‘You would be surprised how many institutions have not made a decision around which their definitive bibliographic records is’, says David.

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Presentation on the Wellcome Library’s digitisation infrastructure. Image credit: Somaya Langley

The last hour was spent pondering the future of digital preservation and I found the conversations very inspiring and uplifting. As we work with the long-term in mind, it is invaluable to have these chances to get out of our local context and discuss wider trends with other professionals. Themes included: digital preservation as part of archival masters courses, cloud storage and virtualisation, and the move from repository software to dispersed micro-services.

The fellow’s field trip to the Wellcome is one of a number of visits that DPOC will make during 2017 talk to institutions around the UK about their work around digital preservation. Watch www.dpoc.ac.uk for more updates.

Post-holiday project update

You may be forgiven for thinking that the DPOC project has gone a little quiet since the festive period. In this post, Sarah summarises the work that continues at a pace.


The Christmas trees have been recycled, the decorations returned to attics or closets, and the last of the mince pies have been eaten. It is time to return to project work and face the reality that we are six months into the DPOC project. That leaves us one and a half years to achieve our aims and bring useful tools and recommendations to Cambridge, Oxford, and the wider digital preservation community. This of course means we’re neck-deep in reporting at the moment, so things have seemed a bit quiet.

So what does that mean for the project at the moment?

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A view of my second screen at the moment. The real challenge is remembering which file I am editing. (Image credit: Sarah Mason)

At both Cambridge and Oxford, all Fellows are working on drafting collection audit reports and reviewing various policies. The Outreach & Training Fellows are disseminating their all staff awareness survey and will be compiling the results from it in February. At Oxford, semi-structured interviews with managers and practitioners working with digital collections is in full swing. At Cambridge, the interviews will start after the awareness survey results have been analysed. This is expected to last through until March – holidays and illnesses willing! The Oxford team is getting their new Technical Fellow, James, up to speed with the project. Cambridge’s Technical Fellow is speaking with many vendors and doing plenty of analysis on the institutional repository.

For those of you attending IDCC in Edinburgh in February, look for our poster on our TRAC and skills audits on our institutional repositories. Make sure to stop by to chat to us about our methodology and early results!

We’re also going to visit colleagues at a number of institutions around the UK over the next few months, seeing some technical systems in action and learning about their staff skills and policies. This knowledge sharing is crucial to the DPOC project, but also the growth of the digital preservation community.

And it’s been six months since the start of the project, so we’re all in reporting mode, writing up and looking over our achievements for the past 6 months. After the reports have been drafted, redrafted, and finalised, expect a full update and some reflections on how this collaborative project is going.

The other place

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The Cambridge team visited Oxford last week. Whilst there won’t be anything of a technical nature in this post, it is worth acknowledging that building and developing a core team for sustainable digital preservation is just as important a function as tools and technical infrastructure.


One of the first reactions we get when we talk about DPOC and its collaborative nature between Oxford and Cambridge is “how on earth do you get anything done?” given the perceived rivalry between the two institutions. “Surprisingly well, thank you” tends to be our answer. Sure, due to the collaborative (and human) nature of any project, there will be times when work doesn’t run parallel and we don’t immediately agree on an approach, but we’ve not let historical rivalry get in the way of working together.

To keep collaboration going, we usually meet on a Wednesday huddled around our respective laptops to participate in a ‘Team Skype’. As a change from this, the Cambridge people (Dave, Lee, Somaya, Suzanne, and Tuan) travelled over to see the Oxford people (Edith, Michael, and Sarah) for two days of valuable face to face meetings and informative talks. The Fellows travelled together; knowing we’d be driving through the rush hour on an east to west traverse, we left a bit earlier. What we hadn’t accounted for was a misbehaving satnav (see below), but it’s the little things like this that make teams bond too. We arrived half an hour before the start for an informal catch-up with Sarah, Edith, and Michael. Such time and interaction is very important to keep the team gelled together.

Satnav misbehaving complicating what is usually a simple left turn at a roundabout. Image credit: Somaya Langley.

Satnav misbehaving, complicating what is usually a simple left turn at a roundabout. Image credit: Somaya Langley.

A team meeting in the Osney One Boardroom formally started the day at 11am. It continued as a working lunch as we had plenty to discuss! We then had a fascinating insight into the developers’ aspects of how materials are ingested into the ORA repository from Michael Davis, followed by an overview from Sarah Barkla on how theses are deposited and their surrounding rights issues. Breaking for a cup of tea and team photo, the team then had split sessions; Sarah and Lee reviewed skills survey work whilst Dave, Edith, and Somaya discussed rationale and approaches to collections auditing.

Thursday saw the continuation of working in smaller teams. Sarah, Lee, and Michael had meetings to discuss PASIG 2017 organisation details. Dave, Edith, and Somaya (later joined by Michael) discussed their joint work before having a talk from Amanda Flynn and David Tomkins on open access and research data management.

Lunchtime heralded the time to board Oxford University’s minibus service to the 14th century Vault Café, St Mary’s Church for a tasty lunch (communal eating and drinking is very important for team building). We then went to the Weston Library to discuss Dave’s digital preservation pattern language over cake in the Weston’s spectacular Blackwell Hall and then on up to the BEAM (Bodleian Electronic Archives and Manuscripts) Lab (a fantastically tidy room with a FRED and many computers) to see and hear Susan Thomas, Matthew Neely, and Rachel Gardner talk about, show, and discuss BEAM’s processes. From a recordkeeping point of view, it was both comforting and refreshing to see that despite working in the digital realm, the archival principles around selection, appraisal, and access rights issues remain constant.

View from the BEAM Lab

The end of the rainbow on the left as viewed from the BEAM lab in the Weston Library. Image credit: Somaya Langley.

The mix of full team sessions, breaking into specialisms, joining up again for talks, and informal talks over tea breaks and lunches was a successful blend of continually building team relationships and contributing to progress. Both teams came away from the two days with reinforced ideas, new ideas, and enhanced clarity of continuing work and aims to keep all aspects of the digital preservation programme on track.

We don’t (and can’t) work in a bubble when it comes to digital preservation and the more that we can share the various components that make up ‘digital preservation’ and collaborate, the better contribution the team can make towards interested communities.

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The DP0C team assembled together on day one in Oxford.