Digital Preservation at Oxford Open Days

Oxford Fellow, Sarah, describes the DPOC team’s pop-up exhibition “Saving Digital,” held at the Radcliffe Science Library during Oxford Open Days #OxOpenDay. The post describes from the equipment and games the team showcased over the two days and some of the goals they had in mind for this outreach work.


On 27 June and 28 June, Oxford ran Open Days for prospective students. The city was alive with open doors and plenty of activity. It was the perfect opportunity for us to take our roadshow kit out and meet with prospective students with a pop-up exhibition called “Saving Digital”. The Radcliffe Science Library (RSL) on Parks Road kindly hosted the DPOC team and all of our obsolete media for two day in their lounge area.

The pop-up exhibition hosted at the RSL

We set up our table with a few goals in mind:

  • to educate prospective students about the rapid pace of technology and the concern about how we’re going to read digital data off them in the future (we educated a few parents as well!)
  • to speak with library and university staff about their digital dilemmas and what we at the digital preservation team could do about it
  • to raise awareness about the urgency and need of digital preservation in all of our lives and to inform more people about our project (#DP0C)

To achieve this, we first drew people in with two things: retro gaming and free stuff.

Last minute marketing to get people to the display. It worked!

Our two main games were the handheld game, Galaxy Invader 1000, and Frak! for the BBC Micro.

Frak! on the BBC Micro. The yellow handheld console to the right is Galaxy Invader 1000.

Galaxy Invader 1000 by CGL (1980) is a handheld game, which plays a version of Space Invaders. This game features a large multi-coloured display and 3 levels of skill. The whole game was designed to fit in 2 kilobytes of memory. 

Frak! (1984) was a game released for the BBC Micro in 1984 under the Aardvark software label. It was praised for excellent graphics and game play. In the side scrolling game, you play a caveman named Trogg. The aim of the game is to cross a series of platforms while avoiding dangers that include various monsters named Poglet and Hooter. Trogg is armed with a yo-yo for defence. 

Second, we gave them some digestible facts, both in poster form and by talking with them:

Saving Digital poster

Third, we filled the rest of the table with obsolete media and handheld devices from about the last forty years—just a small sample of what was available! This let them hold some of the media of the past, marvel over how little it could hold, but how much it could do for the time. And then we asked them how would they read the data off it today. That probably concerned parents more than their kids as several of them admitted to having important digital stuff either still on VHS or miniDV tapes, or on 3.5-inch disks! It got everyone thinking at least.

A lot of obsolete media all in one place.

Lastly, an enthusiastic team with some branded t-shirts made to emulate our most popular 1st generation badge, which was pink with a 3.5-inch disk in the middle. We gave away our last one during Open Days! But don’t worry, we have some great 2nd generation badges to collect now.

An enthusiastic team always helps. Especially if they are willing to demo the equipment.


A huge thank you to the RSL for hosting us for two days—we’ll be back on the 16th of July if you missed us and want to visit the exhibition! We’ll have a few extra retro games on hand and some more obsolete storage media!

Our poster was found on display in the RSL.

Update on the training programme pilot

Sarah, Oxford’s Outreach and Training Fellow, has been busy since the new year designing and a running a digital preservation training programme pilot in Oxford. It consisted of one introductory course on digital preservation and six other workshops. Below is an update on what she did for the pilot and what she has learnt over the past few months.


It’s been a busy few months for me, so I have been quiet on the blog. Most of my time and creative energy has been spent working on this training programme pilot. In total, there were seven courses and over 15 hours of material. In the end, I trialled the courses on over 157 people from Bodleian Libraries and the various Oxford college libraries and archives. Many attendees were repeats, but some were not.

The trial gave me an opportunity to test out different ideas and various topics. Attendees were good at giving feedback, both during the course and after via an online survey. It’s provided me with further ideas and given me the chance to see what works or what doesn’t. I’ve been able to improve the experience each time, but there’s still more work to be done. However, I’ve already learned a lot about digital preservation and teaching.

Below are some of the most important lessons I’ve learned from the training programme pilot.

Time: You always need more

I found that I almost always ran out of time at the end of a course; it left no time for questions or to finish that last demo. Most of my courses could have either benefited from less content, shorter exercises, or just being 30 minutes longer.

Based on feedback from attendees, I’ll be making adjustments to every course. Some will be longer. Some will have shorter exercises with more optional components and some will have slightly less content.

While you might budget 20 minutes for an activity, you will likely use 5-10 minutes more. But it varies every time due to the attendees. Some might have a lot of questions, but others will be quieter. It’s almost better to overestimate the time and end early than rush to cover everythhing. People need a chance to process the information you give them.

Facilitation: You can’t go it alone

In only one of my courses did I have to facilitate alone. I was run off my feet for the 2 hours because it was just me answering questions during  exercises for 15 attendees. It doesn’t sound like a lot, but I had a hoarse voice by the end from speaking for almost 2 hours!

Always get help with facilitation—especially for workshops. Someone to help:

  • answer questions during exercises,
  • get some of the group idea exercises/conversations started,
  • make extra photocopies or print outs, and
  • load programs and files onto computers—and then help delete them after.

It is possible to run training courses alone, but having an extra person makes things run smoother and saves a lot of time. Edith and James have been invaluable support!

Demos: Worth it, but things often go wrong

Demos were vital to illustrate concepts, but they were also sometimes clunky and time consuming to manage. I wrote up demo sheets to help. The demos relied on software or the Internet—both which can and will go wrong. Patience is key; so is accepting that sometimes things will not go right. Processes might take a long time to run or the course concludes before the demo is over.

The more you practice on the computer you will be using, the more likely things will go right. But that’s not always an option. If it isn’t, always have a back up plan. Or just apologise, explain what should have happened and move on. Attendees are generally forgiving and sometimes it can be turned into a really good teaching moment.

Exercises: Optional is the way to go

Unless you put out a questionnaire beforehand, it is incredibly hard to judge the skill level of your attendees. It’s best to prepare for all levels. Start each exercise slow and have a lot of optional work built in for people that work faster.

In most of my courses I was too ambitious for the time allowed. I wanted them to learn and try everything. Sometimes I wasn’t asking the right questions on the exercises either. Testing exercises and timing people is the only way to tailor them. Now that I have run the workshops and seen the exercises in action, I have a clearer picture of what I want people to learn and accomplish—now I just have to make the changes.

Future plans

There were courses I would love to run in the future (like data visualisation and digital forensics), but I did not have the time to develop. I’d like to place them on a roadmap for future training. As well as reaching out more to the Oxford colleges, museums and other departments. I would also like to tailor the introductory course a bit more for different audiences.

I’d like to get involved with developing courses like Digital Preservation Carpentry that the University of Melbourne is working on. The hands-on workshops excited and challenged me the most. Not only did others learn a lot, but so did I. I would like to build on that.

At the end of this pilot, I have seven courses that I will finalise and make available through a creative commons licence. What I learned when trying to develop these courses is that there isn’t always a lot of good templates available on the Internet to use as a starting point—you have to ask around for people willing to share.

So, I am hoping to take the work that I’ve done and share it with the digital preservation community. I hope they will be useful resources that can be reused and repurposed. Or at the very least, I hope it can be used as a starting point for inspiration (basic speakers notes included).

These will be available via the DPOC website sometime this summer, once I have been able to make the changes necessary to the slides and exercises—along with course guidance material. It has been a rewarding experience (as well as an exhausting one); I look forward to developing and delivering more digital preservation training in the future.

Digital preservation with limited resources

What should my digital preservation strategy be, if I do not have access to repository software or a DAMS system?

At Oxford, we recently received this question from a group of information professionals working for smaller archives. This will be a familiar scenario for many – purchasing and running repository software will require a regular dedicated budget, which many archives in the UK do not currently have available to them.

So what intermediate solutions could an archive put in place to better its chances of not losing digital collection content until such a time? This blog summarises some key points from meeting with the archivists, and we hope that these may be useful for other organisations who are asking the same question.


Protect yourself against human error

CC-BY KateMangoStar, Freepik

Human error is one of the major risks to digital content. It is not uncommon that users will inadvertently drag files/folders or delete content by mistake. It is therefore important to have strict user restrictions in place which limits who can delete, move, and edit digital collections. For this purpose you need to ensure that you have defined an “archives directory” which is separate from any “working directories” where users can still edit and actively work with content.

If you have IT support available to you, then speak to them about setting up new user restrictions.


Monitor fixity

CC-BY Dooder, Freepik

However, even with strong user restrictions in place, human error can occur. In addition to enforcing stronger user restrictions in the “archives directory”, tools like Fixity from AVP can be used to spot if content has been moved between folders, deleted, or edited. By running regular Fixity reports an archivist can spot any suspicious looking changes.

We are aware that time constraints are a major factor which inhibits staff from adding additional tasks to their workload, but luckily Fixity can be set to run automatically on a weekly basis, providing users with an email report at the end of the week.


Understand how your organisation does back-ups

CC-BY Shayne_ch13, Freepik

A common IT retention period for back-ups of desktop computers is 14 days. The two week period enables disaster recovery of working environments, to ensure that business can continue as usual. However, a 14 day back-up is not the same as preservation storage and it is not a suitable solution for archival collections.

In this scenario, where content is stored on a file system with no versioning, the archivist only has 14 days to spot any issues and retrieve an older back-up before it is too late. So please don’t go on holiday or get ill for long! Even with tools like Fixity, fourteen days is an unrealistic turn-around time (if the issue is at all spotted in the first place).

If possible, try and make the case to your organisation that you require more varied types of back-ups for the “archival directory”. These should include back-ups which are at least retained for a year. Using a mix of tape storage and/or cloud service providers can be a less expensive way of storing additional back-ups which do not require ongoing access. It is an investment which is worth making.

As a note of warning though – you are still only dealing in back-ups. This is not archival storage. If there are issues with multiple back-ups (due to for example transfer or hardware errors) you can still lose content. The longer term goal, once better back-ups are in place, should be to monitor the fixity of multiple copies of content from the “archival directory”. (For more information about the difference between back-ups used for regular IT purposes and storage for digital preservation see the DPC Handbook)


Check that your back-ups work
Once you have got additional copies of your collection content, remember to check that you can retrieve them again from storage.

Many organisations have been in the positions where they think they have backed up their content – only to find out that their back-ups have not been created properly when they need them. By testing retrieval you can protect your collections against this particular risk.


But… what do I do if my organisation does not do back-ups at all?
Although the 14 day back-up retention is common in many businesses, it is far from the reality which certain types of archives operate within. A small community organisation may for example do all its business on a laptop or workstation which is shared by all staff (including the archive).

This is a dangerous position to be in, as hardware failure can cause immediate and total loss. There is not a magic bullet for solving this issue, but some of the advice which Sarah (Training and Outreach Fellow at Bodleian Libraries) has provided in her Personal Digital Archiving Course could apply.

Considerations from Sarah’s course include:

  • Create back-ups on additional removable hard drive(s) and store them in a different geographical location from the main laptop/workstation
  • Make use of free cloud storage limits (do check the licenses though to see what you are agreeing to – it’s not where you would want to put your HR records!)
  • Again – remember to check your back-ups!
  • For digitized images and video, consider using the Internet Archive’s Gallery as an additional copy (note that this is open to the public, and requires assigning a CC-BY license)  (If you like the work that the Internet Archive does – you can donate to them here )
  • Apply batch-renaming tools to file names to ensure that they contain understandable metadata in case they are separated from their original folders

(Email us if you would like to get a copy of Sarah’s lecture slides with more information)


Document all of the above

CC-BY jcomp, Freepik

Make sure to write down all the decisions you have made regarding back-ups, monitoring, and other activities. This allows for succession planning and ensures that you have a paper trail in place.


Stronger in numbers

CC-BY, Kjpargeter, Freepik

Licenses, contracts and ongoing management is expensive. Another venue to consider is looking to peer organisations to lower some of these costs. This could include entering into joint contracts with tape storage providers, or consortium models for using repository software. An example of an initiative which has done this is the NEA (Network Electronic Archive) group which has been an established repository for over ten years supporting 28 small Danish archives.


Summary:
These are some of the considerations which may lower the risk of losing digital collections. Do you have any other ideas (or practical experience) of managing and preserving digital collections with limited resources, and without using a repository or DAMS system?

Gathering the numbers: a maturity and resourcing survey for digital preservation

The ability to compare ourselves to peer institutions is key when arguing the case for digital preservation within our own organisations. However, finding up-to-date and correct information is not always straight forward.

The Digital Preservation at Oxford and Cambridge (DPOC) project has joined forces with the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) to gather some of the basic numbers that can assist staff in seeking to build a business case for digital preservation in their local institution.

We need your input to make this happen!

The DPOC and the DPC have developed a survey aimed at gathering basic data about maturity levels, staff resources, and the policy and strategy landscapes of institutions currently doing or considering digital preservation activities. (The survey intentionally does not include questions about the type or size of the data organisations are required to preserve.)

Completing the survey will only take 10-20 minutes of your time, and will help us better understand the current digital preservation landscape. The survey can be taken at: https://cambridge.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_brWr12R8hMwfIOh

Deadline for survey responses is: Thursday 31 May 2018.

For those wanting to know upfront what questions are asked in the survey – here is the full set of Survey Questions (PDF). Please keep in mind the survey is interactive and you may not see all of the questions when filling this in online (as the questions only appear in relation to your previous responses). Responses must be submitted through the online survey.

Anonymised data gathered as part of this maturity and resourcing survey will be made available via this DPOC website.

For any questions about the survey and its content, please contact: digitalpreservation@lib.cam.ac.uk

Email preservation 2: it is hard, but why?

A post from Sarah (Oxford) with input from Somaya (Cambridge) about the 24 January 2018 DPC event on email archiving from the Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email Archives.

The discussion of the day circulated around what they had learnt during the year of the task force, that personal and public stories are buried in email, considerable amounts of email have been lost over previous decades, that we should be treating email as data (it allows us to understand other datasets), that current approaches to collecting and preserving email don’t work as they’re not scalable and the need for the integration of artificial intelligence and machine learning (this is already taking place in legal professions with ‘predictive coding’ and clustering technologies) to address email archives, including natural language processing functions is important.


Back in July, Edith attended the first DPC event on email preservation, presented by the Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email Archives. She blogged about here. In January this year, Somaya and I attended the second event hosted again by the DPC.

Under the framework of five working groups, this task force has spent 12 months (2017) focused on five separate areas of the final report, which is due out in around May this year:

  • The Why: Overview / Introduction
  • The When/Who/Where: Email Lifecycles Perspectives
  • The What: The Needs of Researchers
  • The How: Technical Approaches and Solutions
  • The Path Forward: Sustainability & Community Development

The approach being taken is technical, rather than on policy. Membership of the task force includes the DPC, representatives from universities and national institutions from around the world and technology companies including Google and Microsoft.

For Chris Prom (from University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, who authored the 2011 DPC Technology Watch Report on Preserving Email) and Kate Murray’s (Library of Congress and contributor to FADGI) presentation about the work they have been doing, you can view their slides here. Until the final report is published, I have been reviewing the preliminary draft (of June 2017) and available documents to help develop my email preservation training course for Oxford staff in April.

So, when it comes to email preservation, most of the tools and discussions focus on processing email archives. Very little of the discussion has to do with the preservation of email archives over time. There’s a very good reason for this. Processing email archives is the bottleneck in the process, the point at which most institutions are still stuck at. It is hard to make decisions around preservation, when there is no means for collecting email archives or processing them in a timely manner.

There were many excellent questions and proposed solutions from the speakers at the January event. Below are some of the major points from the day that have informed my thinking of how to frame training on email preservation:

Why are email archives so hard to process?

  1. They are big. Few people cull their emails and over time they build up. Reply and ‘reply all’ functions expand out emails chains and attachments are growing in size and diversity. It takes a donor a while to prepare their email archives, much less for an institution to transfer and process them.
  2. They are full of sensitive information. Which is hard to find. Many open source technology assisted review (TAR) tools miss sensitive information. Software used for ‘predictive coding’ and machine learning for reviewing email archives are well out of budget for heritage institutions. Manual review is far too labour intensive.
  3. There is no one tool that can do it all. Email preservation requires ‘tool chaining’ in order to transfer, migrate and process email archives. There are a very wide variety of email software programs which in turn create a many different email file format types. Many of the tools used in email archive processing are not compatible with each of the different email file types; this requires a multiple file format migrations to allow for processing. For a list of some of the current available tools, see the Task Force’s list here.

What are some of the solutions?

  1. Tool chaining will continue. It appears for now, tool chaining is here to stay, often mixing proprietary with open source tools to get workflows running smoothly. This means institutions will need to invest in establishing email processing workflows: the software, people who know about how to handle different email formats etc.
  2. What about researchers? Access to emails is tightly controlled due to sensitivity restraints, but is there space to get researchers to help with the review? If they use the collection for research, could they also be responsible for flagging anything deemed as sensitive? How could this be done ethically?
  3. More automation. Better tool development to assisted with TAR. Reviewing processes must become more automated if email archives are ever to be processed. The scale of work is increasing and traditional appraisal approaches (handling one document at a time) and record schedules are no longer suitable.
  4. Focus on bit-level preservation first. Processing of email archives can come later, but preserving it needs to start on transfer. (But we know users want access and our institutions want to provide this access to email archives.)
  5. Perfection is no longer possible. While archivists would like to be precise, in ‘scaling up’ email archive processing we need to think about it as ‘big data’ and take a ‘good enough’ approach.

Towards a common understanding?

Cambridge Outreach and Training Fellow, Lee, describes the rationale behind trialling a recent workshop on archival science for developers, as well as reflecting on the workshop itself. Its aim was to get those all those working in digital preservation within the organisation to have a better understanding of each other’s work to improve co-operation for a sustainable digital preservation effort.


Quite often, there is a perceived language barrier due to the wide range of practitioners that work in digital preservation. We may be using the same words, but there’s not always a shared common understanding of what they mean. This became clear when I was sitting next to my colleague, a systems integration manager, at an Archivematica workshop in September. Whilst not a member of the core Cambridge DPOC team, our colleague is a key member of our extended digital preservation network at Cambridge University Library a is a key member for development for understanding and retaining digital preservation knowledge in the institution.

For those from a recordkeeping background, the design principles behind the front end of Archivematica should be obvious, as it incorporates both traditional principles of archival practice and features of the OAIS model. However, coming from a systems integration point of view, there was a need to have to translate for my colleague words such as ‘accession’, ‘appraisal’ and ‘arrangement’, which many of us with archival education take their meanings for granted.

I asked my colleague if an introductory workshop on archival science would be useful, and she said, “yes, please!” Thus, the workshop was born. Last week, a two and a half hour workshop was trialled for members of our developer and systems integration colleagues. The aim of the workshop was to enable them to understand what archivists are taught on postgraduate courses and how this teaching informs their practice. After understanding the attendees’ impressions of an archivist and the things that they do (see image) the workshop then practically explored how an archivist would acquire and describe a collection. The workshop was based on an imaginary company, complete with a history and description of the business units and examples of potential records they would deposit. There were practical exercises on making an accession record, appraising a collection, artificial arrangement and subsequent description through ISAD(G).

Sticky notes about archivists

Sticky notes about archivists from a developer point of view.

Having then seen how an archivist would approach a collection, the workshop moved into explaining physical storage and preservation before moving onto digital preservation, specifically looking at OAIS and then examples of digital preservation software systems. One exercise was to get the attendees to use what they had learned in the workshop to see where archival ideas mapped onto the systems.

The workshop tried to demonstrate how archivists have approached digital preservation armed with the professional skills and knowledge that they have. The idea was to inform to teams working with archivists and the digital preservation of how archivists think and how and why some of the tools and products are design in the way that they are. My hope was for ‘IT’ to understand the depth of knowledge that archivists have in order to help everyone work together on a collaborative digital preservation solution.

Feedback was positive and it will be run again in the New Year. Similarly, I’m hoping to devise a course from a developer perspective that will help archivists communicate more effectively with developers. Ultimately, both will be working from a better level of understanding each other’s professional skill sets. Co-operation and collaboration on digital preservation projects will become much easier across disciplines and we’ll have a better informed (and relaxed) environment to share practices and thoughts.

Advocating for digital preservation

Bodleian Libraries and Cambridge University Library are entering into the last phase of the DPOC project, where they are starting to write up business cases for digital preservation. In preparation, the Fellows attended DPC’s “advocacy briefing day” in London.  Policy and Planning Fellow, Edith, blogs about some of the highlights and lessons from the day.


This week I had the pleasure of attending DPC’s advocacy training day. It was ran by Catherine Heaney, the founder of DHR Communications, and a veteran when it comes to advocating for supporting digital heritage. Before the event I thought I had a clear idea of what advocacy means in broad terms. You invite yourself into formal meetings and try to deliver measured facts and figures which will be compelling to the people in front of you – right?

Well… not quite it turns out. Many of these assumptions were put on their head during this session. Here are my four favourite pieces of (sometimes surprising) advocacy advice from Catherine.

Tip 1: Advocacy requires tenaciousness

The scenario which was described above is what communications professionals might call “the speech” – but it is only one little part of effective advocacy. “The digital preservation speech” is important, but it is not necessarily where you will get the most buy-in for digital preservation. Research has shown that one-off communications like these are usually not effective.

In fact, all of those informal connections and conversations you have with colleagues also come under advocacy and may reap greater benefits due to their frequency. And if one of these colleagues are themselves talented at influencing others, they can be invaluable in advocating for digital preservation when you are not there in person.

Lesson learnt: you need to keep communicating the message whenever and wherever you can if you want it to seep in to peoples’ consciousness. Since digital preservation issues do not crop up that often in popular culture and the news, it is up to us to deliver, re-deliver… and then re-deliver the message if we want it to stick.

Tip 2: Do your background research

When you know that you will be interacting with colleagues and senior management, it is important to do your background research and find out what argument will most appeal to the person you are meeting. Having a bog-standard ‘speech’ about digital preservation which you pull out at all occasions is not the most effective approach. In order to make your case, the problem you are attempting to solve should also reflect the goals and the challenges which the person you are trying to advocate to are facing.

The aspects which appeal about digital preservation will be different depending on the role, concerns and responsibilities of the person you are advocating to. Are they concerned with:

  • Legal or reputational risk?
  • Financial costs and return on investment?
  • About being seen as someone at the forefront of the digital preservation fields?
  • Creating reproducible research?
  • Collecting unique collections?
  • Or perhaps about the opportunity to collaborate cross-institutionally?

Tip 3: Ensure that you have material for a “stump speech” ready

Tailoring your message to the audience is important, and this will be easier if you have material ready at hand which you can pick and choose from. Catherine suggested preparing a folder of stories, case studies, data and facts about digital preservation which you can cut and paste from to suit the occasion.

What is interesting though is the order of that list of “things to collect”:

  1. Stories
  2. Case studies
  3. Data and facts

The ranking is intentional. We tend to think that statistics and raw data will convince people, as this appeals to their logic. In fact, your argument will be stronger if your pitch starts with a narrative (a story) about WHY we need digital preservation and case studies to illustrate your point.  Catherine advises that it is then when the audience is listening that you bring out the data and facts. This approach is both more memorable and more effective in capturing your audience’s attention.

Tip 4: Personalise your follow up

This connects to tip 2 – about knowing your audience. Catherine advised that, although it may feel strange at first, writing a personalised follow up message is a very effective tool. When you do have the chance to present your case to an important group within your organisation, the follow up message can further solidify that initial pitch (again – see tip 1 about repeated communication).

By taking notes about the concerns or points that have been made during a meeting, you have the opportunity to write personalised messages which captures and refers back to the concerns raised by that particular person. The personalised message also has the additional benefit of opening up a channel for future communication.


This was just a small subsection of all the interesting things we talked about on the advocacy briefing day. For some more information have a look at the hashtag for the day #DPAdvocacy.

Institutional risk and born-digital content: the shutdown of DCist #IDPD17

Another post for today’s International Digital Preservation Day 2017. Outreach and Training Fellow, Sarah, discusses just how real institutional risk is and how it can lead to a loss of born digital archives — a risk that digital-only sites like DCist have recently proven. Read more about the Gothamist’s website shutdowns this November.


In today’s world, so much of what we create and share exists only in digital form. These digital-only creations are referred to as born-digital — they were created digitally and they often continue in that way. And so much of our born-digital content is shared online. We often take for granted content on the Internet, assuming it will always be there. But is it? Likely it will at least be captured by the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine or a library web archiving equivalent. But is that actually enough? Does it capture a complete, usable record? What happens when a digital-only creation, like a magazine or newspaper, is shut down?

Institutional risk is real. In the commercial world of born-digital content that persists only in digital form, the risk of loss is high.

Unfortunately, there’s recently been a very good example of this kind of risk when the Gothamist shut down its digital-only content sites such as the DCist. This happened in early November this year.

The sites and all the associated content was completely removed from the Internet by the morning of 3 November. Gone. Taken down and replaced with a letter from billionaire CEO, Joe Ricketts, justifying the shutdown because despite its enormous popularity and readership, it just wasn’t “economically successful.”

Wayback Machine’s capture of the redirect page and Ricketts’ letter

The DCist site and all of its content was gone completely; readers instead were redirected to another page entirely to read Joe Ricketts’ letter. Someone had literally pulled the plug on the whole thing.

Internet Archive’s 3 November 2017 capture, showing a redirect from the DCist.com page. DCist was gone from the Internet.

The access to content was completely lost, save for what the Internet Archive captured and what content was saved by creators elsewhere. But access to the archives of 13 years of DCist content was taken from the Internet and its millions of readers. At that point all we had were some web captures, incomplete records of the content left to us.

The Internet Archive’s web captures for DCist.com over the past 13 years.

What would happen to the DCist’s archive now? All over Twitter people were being sent to Internet Archive or to check Google’s cache to download the lost content. But as Benjamin Freed pointed out in his recent Washingtonian article:

“Those were noble recommendations, but would have been incomplete. The Wayback Machine requires knowledge about URLs, and versions stored in Google’s memory banks do not last long enough. And, sure, many of the subjects DCist wrote about were covered by others, but not all of them, and certainly not with the attitude with which the site approached the world.”

As Freed reminds us “A newspaper going out of business is tragic, but when it happens, we don’t torch the old issues or yank the microfilms from the local library.” In the world of born-digital content, simply unplugging the servers and leaving the digital archive to rot means that at best, we may only have an incomplete record of the 1,000s of articles and content of a community.

If large organisations are not immune to this kind of institutional risk, what about the small ones? The underfunded ones?

To be clear, I think web archiving is important and I have used it a number of times when a site is no longer available — it’s a valuable resource. But it only goes so far and sometimes the record of website is incomplete. So what else can we do? How can we keep the digital archive alive? The good news is that while Ricketts has put the DCist site back up as an “archive” — it’s more like a “digital graveyard” that he could pull the plug on again any time he wants. How do you preserve something so fragile, so at risk? The custodians of the digital content care little for it, so how will it survive for the future?

The good news is that the DCist archive may have another home, not just one that survives on the mercy of a CEO.

The born-digital archives of the DCist require more than just a functioning server over time to ensure access. Fortunately, there are places where digital preservation is happening to all kinds of born-digital collections and there are passionate people who are custodians of this content. These custodians care about keeping it accessible and understandable for future generations. Something that Joe Ricketts clearly does not.


What are your thoughts on this type of institutional risk and its impacts on digital preservation? How can we preserve this type of content in the future? Is web archiving enough or do we need a multi-prong approach? Share your thoughts below and on Twitter using the #IDPD17 hashtag.

 

The vision for a preservation repository

Over the last couple of months, work at Cambridge University Library has begun to look at what a potential digital preservation system will look like, considering technical infrastructure, the key stakeholders and the policies underpinning them. Technical Fellow, Dave, tells us more about the holistic vision…


This post discusses some of the work we’ve been doing to lay foundations beneath the requirements for a ‘preservation system’ here at Cambridge. In particular, we’re looking at the core vision for the system. It comes with the standard ‘work in progress’ caveats – do not be surprised if the actual vision varies slightly (or more) from what’s discussed here. A lot of the below comes from Mastering the Requirements Process by Suzanne and James Robertson.

Also – it’s important to note that what follows is based upon a holistic definition of ‘system’ – a definition that’s more about what people know and do, and less about Information Technology, bits of tin and wiring.

Why does a system change need a vision?

New systems represent changes to the existing status-quo. The vision is like the Pole Star for such a change effort – it ensures that people have something fixed to move towards when they’re buried under minute details. When confusion reigns, you can point to the vision for the system to guide you back to sanity.

Plus, as with all digital efforts, none of this is real: there’s no definite, obvious end point to the change. So the vision will help us recognise when we’ve achieved what we set out to.

Establishing scope and context

Defining what the system change isn’t is a particularly good a way of working out what it actually represents. This can be achieved by thinking about the systems around the area you’re changing and the information that’s going to flow in and out. This sort of thinking makes for good diagrams: one that shows how a preservation repository system might sit within the broader ecosystem of digitisation, research outputs / data, digital archives and digital published material is shown below.

System goals

Being able to concisely sum-up the key goals of the system is another important part of the vision. This is a lot harder than it sounds and there’s something journalistic about it – what you leave out is definitely more important than what you keep in. Fortunately, the vision is about broad brush strokes, not detail, which helps at this stage.

I found some great inspiration in Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet, which indicated goals such as: “the system should make the value of preserving digital resources clear”, “the system should clearly support stakeholders’ incentives to preserve digital resources” and “the functional aspects of the system should map onto clearly-defined preservation roles and responsibilities”.

Who are we implementing this for?

The final main part of the ‘vision’ puzzle is the stakeholders: who is going to benefit from a preservation system? Who might not benefit directly, but really cares that one exists?

Any significant project is likely to have a LOT of these, so the Robertsons suggest breaking the list down by proximity to the system (using Ian Alexander’s Onion Model), from the core team that uses the system, through the ‘operational work area’ (i.e. those with the need to actually use it) and out to interested parties within the host organisation, and then those in the wider world beyond. An initial attempt at thinking about our stakeholders this way is shown below.

One important thing that we realised was that it’s easy to confuse ‘closeness’ with ‘importance’: there are some very important stakeholders in the ‘wider world’ (e.g. Research Councils or historians) that need to be kept in the loop.

A proposed vision for our preservation repository

After iterating through all the above a couple of times, the current working vision (subject to change!) for a digital preservation repository at Cambridge University Library is as follows:

The repository is the place where the best possible copies of digital resources are stored, kept safe, and have their usefulness maintained. Any future initiatives that need the most perfect copy of those resources will be able to retrieve them from the repository, if authorised to do so. At any given time, it will be clear how the digital resources stored in the repository are being used, how the repository meets the preservation requirements of stakeholders, and who is responsible for the various aspects of maintaining the digital resources stored there.

Hopefully this will give us a clear concept to refer back to as we delve into more detail throughout the months and years to come…

Planning your (digital) funeral: for projects

Cambridge Policy & Planning Fellow, Somaya, writes about her paper and presentation from the Digital Culture Heritage Conference 2017. The conference paper, Planning for the End from the Start: an Argument for Digital Stewardship, Long-Term Thinking and Alternative Capture Approaches, looks at considering digital preservation at the start of a digital humanities project and provides useful advice for digital humanities researchers to use in their current projects.


In August I presented at the Digital Cultural Heritage 2017 international conference in Berlin (incidentally, my favourite city in the whole world).

Berlin - view from the river Spree. Photo: Somaya Langley

Berlin – view from the river Spree. Photo: Somaya Langley

I presented the Friday morning Plenary session on Planning for the End from the Start: an Argument for Digital Stewardship, Long-Term Thinking and Alternative Capture Approaches. Otherwise known as: ‘planning for your funeral when you are conceived’. This is a presentation that represents challenges faced by both Oxford and Cambridge and the thinking behind this has been done collaboratively by myself and my Oxford Policy & Planning counterpart, Edith Halvarsson.

We decided it was a good idea to present on this topic to an international digital cultural heritage audience, who are likely to also experience similar challenges as our own researchers. It is based on some common digital preservation use cases that we are finding in each of our universities.

The Scenario

A Digital Humanities project receives project funding and develops a series of digital materials as part of the research project, and potentially some innovative tools as well. For one reason or another, ongoing funding cannot be secured and so the PIs/project team need to find a new home for the digital outputs of the project.

Example Cases

We have numerous examples of these situations at Cambridge and Oxford. Many projects containing digital content that needs to be ‘rehoused’ are created in the online environment, typically as websites. Some examples include:

Holistic Thinking

We believe that thinking holistically right at the start of a project can provide options further down the line, should an unfavourable funding outcome be received.

So it is important to consider holistic thinking, specifically a Digital Stewardship approach (incorporating Digital Curation & Digital Preservation).

Models for Preservation

Digital materials don’t necessarily exist in a static form and often they don’t exist in isolation. It’s important to think about digital content as being part of a lifecycle and managed by a variety of different workflows. Digital materials are also subject to many risks so these also need to be considered.

Some models to frame thinking about digital materials:

Documentation

It is incredibly important to document your project and when handing over the responsibility of your digital materials and data, also handing over documentation to someone responsible for hosting or preserving your digital project will need to rely on this information. Also ensuring the implementation of standards, metadata schemas and persistent identifiers etc.

This can include providing associated materials, such as:

Data Management Plans

Some better use of Data Management Plans (DMPs) could be:

  • Submitting DMPs alongside the data
  • Writing DMPs as dot-points rather than prose
  • Including Technical Specifications such as information about code, software, software versions, hardware and other dependencies

An example of a DMP from Cambridge University’s Dr Laurent Gatto: Data Management Plan for a Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Borrowing from Other Disciplines

Rather than having to ‘rebuild the wheel’, we should also consider borrowing from other disciplines. For example, borrowing from the performing arts we might provide similar documents and information such as:

  • Technical Rider (a list of requirements for staging a music gig and theatre show)
  • Stage Plots (layout of instruments, performers and other equipment on stage)
  • Input Lists (ordered list of the different audio channels from your instruments/microphones etc. that you’ll need to send to the mixing desk)

For digital humanities projects and other complex digital works, providing simple and straight forward information about data flows (including inputs and outputs) will greatly assist digital preservationists in determining where something has broken in the future.

Several examples of Technical Riders can be found here:

Approaches

Here are some approaches to consider in regards to interim digital preservation of digital materials:

Bundling & Bitstream Preservation

The simplest and most basic approach may be to just zip up files and undertake bitstream preservation. Bitstream preservation only ensures that the zeroes and ones that went into a ‘system’ come out as the same zeroes and ones. Nothing more.

Exporting / Migrating

Consider exporting digital materials and/or data plus metadata into recognised standards as a means of migrating into another system.

For databases, the SIARD (Software Independent Archiving of Relational Databases) standard may be of use.

Hosting Code

Consider hosting code within your own institutional repository or digital preservation system (if your organisation has access to this option) or somewhere like GitHub or other services.

Packing it Down & ‘Putting on Ice’

You may need to consider ‘packing up’ your digital materials and doing it in a way that you can ‘put it on ice’. Doing this in a way that – when funding is secured in the future – it can be somewhat simply be brought back to life.

An example of this is the the work that Peter Sefton, from the University of Sydney in Australia, has been trialling. Based on Omeka, he has created a version of code called OzMeka. This is an attempt at a standardised way of being able to handle research project digital outputs that have been presented online. One example of this is Dharmae.

Alternatively, the Kings Digital Lab, provide infrastructure for eResearch and Digital Humanities projects that ensure the foundations of digital projects are stable from the get-go and mitigates risks regarding longer-term sustainability of digital content created as part of the projects.

Maintaining Access

This could be done through traditional web archiving approaches, such as using tools Web Archiving Tools (Heritrix or HTTrack) or downloading video materials using Video Download Helper for video. Alternatively, if you are part of an institution, the Internet Archive’s ArchiveIt service may be something you want to consider and can work with your institution to implement this.

Hosted Infrastructure Arrangements

Finding another organisation to take on the hosting of your service. If you do manage to negotiate this, you will need to either put in place a contract or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) as well as handing over various documentation, which I have mentioned earlier.

Video Screen Capture

A simple way of attempting to document a journey through a complex digital work (not necessarily online, this can apply to other complex interactive digital works as well), may be by way of capturing a Video Screen Capture.

Kymata Atlas - Video Screen Capture still

Kymata Atlas – Video Screen Capture still

Alternatively, recording a journey through an interactive website using the Webrecorder, developed by Rhizome, which will produce WARC web archive files.

Documenting in Context

Another means of understanding complex digital objects is to document the work in the context in which it was experienced. One example of this is the work of Robert Sakrowski and Constant Dullart, netart.database.

An example of this is the work of Dutch and Belgian net.artists JODI (Joan Heemskerk & Dirk Paesmans) shown here.

JODI - netart.database

JODI – netart.database

Borrowing from documenting and archiving in the arts, an approach of ‘documenting around the work‘ might be suitable – for example, photographing and videoing interactive audiovisual installations.

Web Archives in Context

Another opportunity to understand websites – if they have been captured by the Internet Archive – is viewing these websites using another tool developed by Rhizome, oldweb.today.

An example of the Cambridge University Library website from 1997, shown in a Netscape 3.04 browser.

Cambridge University Library website in 1997 via oldweb.today

Cambridge University Library website in 1997 via oldweb.today

Conclusions

While there is no one perfect solution and each have their own pros and cons, using an approach that combines different methods might make your digital materials available post the lifespan of your project. These methods will help ensure that digital material is suitably documented, preserved and potentially accessible – so that both you and others can use the data in an ongoing manner.

Consider:

  • How you want to preserve the data?
  • How you want to provide access to your digital material?
  • Developing a strategy including several different methods.

Finally, I think this excerpt is relevant to how we approach digital stewardship and digital preservation:

“No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main” – Meditation XVII, John Donne

We are all in this together and rather than each having to troubleshoot alone and building our own separate solutions, it would be great if we can work to our strengths in collaborative ways, while sharing our knowledge and skills with others.