(Mis)Adventures in guest blogging

Sarah shares her recent DPC guest blogging experience. The post is available to read at: http://www.dpconline.org/blog/beware-of-the-leopard-oxford-s-adventures-in-the-bottom-drawer 


As members of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), we have the opportunity to contribute to their blog on issues in digital preservation. As the Outreach & Training Fellow at Oxford, that tasks falls upon me when its our turn to contribute.

You would think that because I contribute to this blog regularly,  I’d be an old hat at blogging. It turns out that writer’s block can hit at precisely the worst possible time. But, I forced out what I could and then turned to the other Fellows at Oxford for support. Edith and James both added their own work to the post.

With a final draft ready, the day approached when we could submit it to the blog. Even the technically-minded struggled with technology now and again. First, it was the challenge of uploading images—it only took about 2 or 3 tries and then I deleted the evidence mistakes. Finally, I clicked ‘submit’ and waited for confirmation.

And I waited…

And got sent back to the homepage. Then I got a ‘failure notice’ email that said “I’m afraid I wasn’t able to deliver your message to the following addresses. This is a permanent error; I’ve given up. Sorry it didn’t work out.” What just happened? Did it work or not?

So I tried again….

And again…

And again.  I think I submitted 6 more times before I emailed to the DPC to ask what I had done wrong. I had done NOTHING wrong, except press ‘submit’ too much. There were as many copies waiting for approval as there were times when I had hit ‘submit’. There was no way to delete the evidence, so I couldn’t avoid that embarrassment.

Minus those technological snafus, everything worked and the DPOC team’s first guest blog post is live! You can read the post here for an Oxford DPOC project update.

Now that I’ve got my technological mistakes out of the way, I think I’m ready to continue contributing to the wider digital preservation community through guest blogging. We are a growing (but still relatively small) community and sharing our knowledge, ideas and experiences freely through blogs is important. We rely on each other to navigate the field where things can be complex and ever-changing. Journals and project websites date quickly, but community-driven and non-profit blogs remain a good source of relevant and immediate information. They are valuable part of my digital preservation work and I am happy to be giving back.

 

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