Polonsky Fellows visit Western Bank Library at Sheffield University

Overview of DPOC’s visit to the Western Bank Library at Sheffield University by James Mooney, Technical Fellow at Bodleian Libraries, Oxford.
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The Polonsky Fellows were invited to the Western Bank Library at Sheffield University to speak with Laura Peaurt and other members of the Library. The aim of the meeting was to discuss the experiences of using and implementing Ex Libris’ Rosetta product.

After arriving by train, it was just a quick tram ride to Western Bank campus at Sheffield University, then we had the fun of using the paternoster lift in the Western Bank Library to arrive at our meeting, it’s great to see this technology has been preserved and still in use.

Paternoster lifts still in use at the Western Library. Image Credit: James Mooney

We met with Laura Peaurt (Digital Preservation Manager), Chris Jones (Library Systems Manager) and Angus Taggart (Library Systems Manager – Research).

Andy Bussey, Head of Digital Services & Systems was kind enough to give us an hour of his time at the start of the meeting, allowing us to discuss parts of the procurement and implementation process.

When working out the requirements for the system, Sheffield was able to collaborate with the White Rose University Consortium (the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York) to work out an initial scope.

When reviewing the options both open source and proprietary products were considered. For the Western Library and the University back in 2014, after a skills audit, the open source options had to be ruled out due to a lack of technical and developmental skills to customise or support them. I’m sure if this was revisited today the outcome may well have been different as the team has grown and gained experience and expertise. Many organisations may find it easier to budget for a software package and support contract with a vendor than to pursue the creation of several new employment positions.

With that said, as part of the implementation of Rosetta, Laura’s role was created as there was an obvious need for a Digital Preservation manager, we then went on to discuss the timeframe of the project and then moved onto the configuration of the product with Laura providing a live demonstration of the product whilst talking about the current setup, the scalability of the instances and the granularity of the sections within Rosetta.

During the demonstrations we discussed what content was held in Rosetta, how people had been trained with Rosetta and what feedback they had received so far. We reviewed the associated metadata which had been stored with the items that had been ingested and went over the options regarding integration with a Catalogue and/or Archival Management System.

After lunch we went on discuss the workflows currently being used with further demonstrations so we could see an end-to-end examples including what ingest rules and polices were in place along with what tools were in use and what processes were carried out. We then looked at how problematic items were dealt with in the Technical Analysis Workbench, covering the common issues and how additional steps in the ingest process can minimise certain issues.

As part of reviewing the sections of Rosetta we also inspected of Rosetta’s metadata model, the DNX (Digital Normalised XML) and discussed ingesting born-digital content and associated METS files.

Western Library. Image Credit: A J Buildings Library.

We visited Sheffield with many questions and during the course of the discussions throughout the day many of these were answered but as the day came to a close we had to wrap up the talks and head back to the train station. We all agreed it had been an invaluable meeting and sparked further areas of discussion. Having met face to face and with an understanding of the environment at Sheffield will make future conversations that much easier.

DPOC visits the Wellcome Library in London

A brief summary by Edith Halvarsson, Policy and Planning Fellow at the Bodleian Libraries, of the DPOC project’s recent visit to the Wellcome Library.
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Last Friday the Polonsky Fellows had the pleasure of spending a day with Rioghnach Ahern and David Thompson at the Wellcome Library. With a collection of over 28.6 million digitized images, the Wellcome is a great source of knowledge and experience in working with digitisation at a large scale. Themes of the day centred around pragmatic choices, achieving consistency across time and scale, and horizon scanning for emerging trends.

The morning started with an induction from Christy Henshaw, the Wellcome’s Digital Production Manager. We discussed digitisation collection development and Jpeg2000 profiles, but also future directions for the library’s digitised collection. One point which particularly stood out to me, was changes in user requirements around delivery of digitised collections. The Wellcome has found that researchers are increasingly requesting delivery of material for “use as data”. (As a side note: this is something which the Bodleian Libraries have previously explored in their Blockbooks project, which used facial recognition algorithms traditionally associated with security systems, to trace provenance of dispersed manuscripts). As the possibilities for large scale analysis using these types of algorithms multiply, the Wellcome is considering how delivery will need to change to accommodate new scholarly research methods.

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Brain teaser: Spot the Odd One Out (or is it a trick question?). Image credit: Somaya Langley

Following Christy’s talk we were given a tour of the digitization studios by Laurie Auchterlonie. Laurie was in the process of digitising recipe books for the Wellcome Library’s Recipe Book Project. He told us about some less appetising recipes from the collection (such as three-headed pig soup, and puppy dishes) and about the practical issues of photographing content in a studio located on top of one of the busiest underground lines in London!

After lunch with David and Rioghnach at the staff café, we spent the rest of the afternoon looking at Goobi plug-ins, Preservica and the Wellcome’s hybrid-cloud storage model. Despite talking digitisation – metadata was a reoccurring topic in several of the presentations. Descriptive metadata is particularly challenging to manage as it tends to be a work in progress – always possible to improve and correct. This creates a tension between curators and cataloguers doing their work, and the inclination to store metadata together with digital objects in preservation systems to avoid orphaning files. Wellcome’s solution has been to articulate their three core cataloguing systems as the canonical bibliographic source, while allowing potentially out of data metadata to travel with objects in both Goobi and Preservica for in-house use only. As long as there is clarity around which is the canonical metadata record, these inconsistencies are not problematic to the library. ‘You would be surprised how many institutions have not made a decision around which their definitive bibliographic records is’, says David.

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Presentation on the Wellcome Library’s digitisation infrastructure. Image credit: Somaya Langley

The last hour was spent pondering the future of digital preservation and I found the conversations very inspiring and uplifting. As we work with the long-term in mind, it is invaluable to have these chances to get out of our local context and discuss wider trends with other professionals. Themes included: digital preservation as part of archival masters courses, cloud storage and virtualisation, and the move from repository software to dispersed micro-services.

The fellow’s field trip to the Wellcome is one of a number of visits that DPOC will make during 2017 talk to institutions around the UK about their work around digital preservation. Watch www.dpoc.ac.uk for more updates.

Post-holiday project update

You may be forgiven for thinking that the DPOC project has gone a little quiet since the festive period. In this post, Sarah summarises the work that continues at a pace.


The Christmas trees have been recycled, the decorations returned to attics or closets (or lofts and cupboards… – ed.), and the last of the mince pies have been eaten. It is time to return to project work and face the reality that we are six months into the DPOC project. That leaves us one and a half years to achieve our aims and bring useful tools and recommendations to Cambridge, Oxford, and the wider digital preservation community. This of course means we’re neck-deep in reporting at the moment, so things have seemed a bit quiet.

So what does that mean for the project at the moment?

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A view of my second screen at the moment. The real challenge is remembering which file I am editing. (Image credit: Sarah Mason)

At both Cambridge and Oxford, all Fellows are working on drafting collection audit reports and reviewing various policies. The Outreach & Training Fellows are disseminating their all staff awareness survey and will be compiling the results from it in February. At Oxford, semi-structured interviews with managers and practitioners working with digital collections is in full swing. At Cambridge, the interviews will start after the awareness survey results have been analysed. This is expected to last through until March – holidays and illnesses willing! The Oxford team is getting their new Technical Fellow, James, up to speed with the project. Cambridge’s Technical Fellow is speaking with many vendors and doing plenty of analysis on the institutional repository.

For those of you attending IDCC in Edinburgh in February, look for our poster on our TRAC and skills audits on our institutional repositories. Make sure to stop by to chat to us about our methodology and early results!

We’re also going to visit colleagues at a number of institutions around the UK over the next few months, seeing some technical systems in action and learning about their staff skills and policies. This knowledge sharing is crucial to the DPOC project, but also the growth of the digital preservation community.

And it’s been six months since the start of the project, so we’re all in reporting mode, writing up and looking over our achievements for the past 6 months. After the reports have been drafted, redrafted, and finalised, expect a full update and some reflections on how this collaborative project is going.