Gathering the numbers: a maturity and resourcing survey for digital preservation

The ability to compare ourselves to peer institutions is key when arguing the case for digital preservation within our own organisations. However, finding up-to-date and correct information is not always straight forward.

The Digital Preservation at Oxford and Cambridge (DPOC) project has joined forces with the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) to gather some of the basic numbers that can assist staff in seeking to build a business case for digital preservation in their local institution.

We need your input to make this happen!

The DPOC and the DPC have developed a survey aimed at gathering basic data about maturity levels, staff resources, and the policy and strategy landscapes of institutions currently doing or considering digital preservation activities. (The survey intentionally does not include questions about the type or size of the data organisations are required to preserve.)

Completing the survey will only take 10-20 minutes of your time, and will help us better understand the current digital preservation landscape. The survey can be taken at: https://cambridge.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_brWr12R8hMwfIOh

Deadline for survey responses is: Thursday 31 May 2018.

For those wanting to know upfront what questions are asked in the survey – here is the full set of Survey Questions (PDF). Please keep in mind the survey is interactive and you may not see all of the questions when filling this in online (as the questions only appear in relation to your previous responses). Responses must be submitted through the online survey.

Anonymised data gathered as part of this maturity and resourcing survey will be made available via this DPOC website.

For any questions about the survey and its content, please contact: digitalpreservation@lib.cam.ac.uk

Advocating for digital preservation

Bodleian Libraries and Cambridge University Library are entering into the last phase of the DPOC project, where they are starting to write up business cases for digital preservation. In preparation, the Fellows attended DPC’s “advocacy briefing day” in London.  Policy and Planning Fellow, Edith, blogs about some of the highlights and lessons from the day.


This week I had the pleasure of attending DPC’s advocacy training day. It was ran by Catherine Heaney, the founder of DHR Communications, and a veteran when it comes to advocating for supporting digital heritage. Before the event I thought I had a clear idea of what advocacy means in broad terms. You invite yourself into formal meetings and try to deliver measured facts and figures which will be compelling to the people in front of you – right?

Well… not quite it turns out. Many of these assumptions were put on their head during this session. Here are my four favourite pieces of (sometimes surprising) advocacy advice from Catherine.

Tip 1: Advocacy requires tenaciousness

The scenario which was described above is what communications professionals might call “the speech” – but it is only one little part of effective advocacy. “The digital preservation speech” is important, but it is not necessarily where you will get the most buy-in for digital preservation. Research has shown that one-off communications like these are usually not effective.

In fact, all of those informal connections and conversations you have with colleagues also come under advocacy and may reap greater benefits due to their frequency. And if one of these colleagues are themselves talented at influencing others, they can be invaluable in advocating for digital preservation when you are not there in person.

Lesson learnt: you need to keep communicating the message whenever and wherever you can if you want it to seep in to peoples’ consciousness. Since digital preservation issues do not crop up that often in popular culture and the news, it is up to us to deliver, re-deliver… and then re-deliver the message if we want it to stick.

Tip 2: Do your background research

When you know that you will be interacting with colleagues and senior management, it is important to do your background research and find out what argument will most appeal to the person you are meeting. Having a bog-standard ‘speech’ about digital preservation which you pull out at all occasions is not the most effective approach. In order to make your case, the problem you are attempting to solve should also reflect the goals and the challenges which the person you are trying to advocate to are facing.

The aspects which appeal about digital preservation will be different depending on the role, concerns and responsibilities of the person you are advocating to. Are they concerned with:

  • Legal or reputational risk?
  • Financial costs and return on investment?
  • About being seen as someone at the forefront of the digital preservation fields?
  • Creating reproducible research?
  • Collecting unique collections?
  • Or perhaps about the opportunity to collaborate cross-institutionally?

Tip 3: Ensure that you have material for a “stump speech” ready

Tailoring your message to the audience is important, and this will be easier if you have material ready at hand which you can pick and choose from. Catherine suggested preparing a folder of stories, case studies, data and facts about digital preservation which you can cut and paste from to suit the occasion.

What is interesting though is the order of that list of “things to collect”:

  1. Stories
  2. Case studies
  3. Data and facts

The ranking is intentional. We tend to think that statistics and raw data will convince people, as this appeals to their logic. In fact, your argument will be stronger if your pitch starts with a narrative (a story) about WHY we need digital preservation and case studies to illustrate your point.  Catherine advises that it is then when the audience is listening that you bring out the data and facts. This approach is both more memorable and more effective in capturing your audience’s attention.

Tip 4: Personalise your follow up

This connects to tip 2 – about knowing your audience. Catherine advised that, although it may feel strange at first, writing a personalised follow up message is a very effective tool. When you do have the chance to present your case to an important group within your organisation, the follow up message can further solidify that initial pitch (again – see tip 1 about repeated communication).

By taking notes about the concerns or points that have been made during a meeting, you have the opportunity to write personalised messages which captures and refers back to the concerns raised by that particular person. The personalised message also has the additional benefit of opening up a channel for future communication.


This was just a small subsection of all the interesting things we talked about on the advocacy briefing day. For some more information have a look at the hashtag for the day #DPAdvocacy.

The vision for a preservation repository

Over the last couple of months, work at Cambridge University Library has begun to look at what a potential digital preservation system will look like, considering technical infrastructure, the key stakeholders and the policies underpinning them. Technical Fellow, Dave, tells us more about the holistic vision…


This post discusses some of the work we’ve been doing to lay foundations beneath the requirements for a ‘preservation system’ here at Cambridge. In particular, we’re looking at the core vision for the system. It comes with the standard ‘work in progress’ caveats – do not be surprised if the actual vision varies slightly (or more) from what’s discussed here. A lot of the below comes from Mastering the Requirements Process by Suzanne and James Robertson.

Also – it’s important to note that what follows is based upon a holistic definition of ‘system’ – a definition that’s more about what people know and do, and less about Information Technology, bits of tin and wiring.

Why does a system change need a vision?

New systems represent changes to the existing status-quo. The vision is like the Pole Star for such a change effort – it ensures that people have something fixed to move towards when they’re buried under minute details. When confusion reigns, you can point to the vision for the system to guide you back to sanity.

Plus, as with all digital efforts, none of this is real: there’s no definite, obvious end point to the change. So the vision will help us recognise when we’ve achieved what we set out to.

Establishing scope and context

Defining what the system change isn’t is a particularly good a way of working out what it actually represents. This can be achieved by thinking about the systems around the area you’re changing and the information that’s going to flow in and out. This sort of thinking makes for good diagrams: one that shows how a preservation repository system might sit within the broader ecosystem of digitisation, research outputs / data, digital archives and digital published material is shown below.

System goals

Being able to concisely sum-up the key goals of the system is another important part of the vision. This is a lot harder than it sounds and there’s something journalistic about it – what you leave out is definitely more important than what you keep in. Fortunately, the vision is about broad brush strokes, not detail, which helps at this stage.

I found some great inspiration in Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet, which indicated goals such as: “the system should make the value of preserving digital resources clear”, “the system should clearly support stakeholders’ incentives to preserve digital resources” and “the functional aspects of the system should map onto clearly-defined preservation roles and responsibilities”.

Who are we implementing this for?

The final main part of the ‘vision’ puzzle is the stakeholders: who is going to benefit from a preservation system? Who might not benefit directly, but really cares that one exists?

Any significant project is likely to have a LOT of these, so the Robertsons suggest breaking the list down by proximity to the system (using Ian Alexander’s Onion Model), from the core team that uses the system, through the ‘operational work area’ (i.e. those with the need to actually use it) and out to interested parties within the host organisation, and then those in the wider world beyond. An initial attempt at thinking about our stakeholders this way is shown below.

One important thing that we realised was that it’s easy to confuse ‘closeness’ with ‘importance’: there are some very important stakeholders in the ‘wider world’ (e.g. Research Councils or historians) that need to be kept in the loop.

A proposed vision for our preservation repository

After iterating through all the above a couple of times, the current working vision (subject to change!) for a digital preservation repository at Cambridge University Library is as follows:

The repository is the place where the best possible copies of digital resources are stored, kept safe, and have their usefulness maintained. Any future initiatives that need the most perfect copy of those resources will be able to retrieve them from the repository, if authorised to do so. At any given time, it will be clear how the digital resources stored in the repository are being used, how the repository meets the preservation requirements of stakeholders, and who is responsible for the various aspects of maintaining the digital resources stored there.

Hopefully this will give us a clear concept to refer back to as we delve into more detail throughout the months and years to come…

Visit to the Parliamentary Archives: Training and business cases

Edith Halvarsson, Policy and Planning Fellow at Bodleian Libraries, writes about the DPOC project’s recent visit to the Parliamentary Archives.


This week the DPOC fellows visited the Parliamentary Archives in London. Thank you very much to Catherine Hardman (Head of Preservation and Access), Chris Fryer (Digital Archivist) and Grace Bell (Digital Preservation Trainee) for having us. Shamefully I have to admit that we have been very slow to make this trip; Chris first invited us to visit all the way back in September last year! However, our tardiness to make our way to Westminster was in the end aptly timed with the completion of year one of the DPOC project and planning for year 2.

Like CUL and Bodleian Libraries, the Parliamentary Archives also first began their own Digital Preservation Project back in 2010. Their project has since transitioned into digital preservation in a more programmatic capacity as of 2015. As CUL and Bodleian Libraries will be beginning to draft business cases for moving from project to programme in year 2; meeting with Chris and Catherine was a good opportunity to talk about how you start making that tricky transition.

Of course, every institution has its own drivers and risks which influence business cases for digital preservation, but there are certain things which will sound familiar to a lot of organisations. For example, what Parliamentary Archives have found over the past seven years, is that advocacy for digital collections and training staff in digital preservation skills is an ongoing activity. Implementing solutions is one thing, whereas maintaining them is another. This, in addition to staff who have received digital preservation training eventually moving on to new institutions, means that you constantly need to stay on top of advocacy and training. Making “the business case” is therefore not a one-off task.

Another central challenge in terms of building business cases, is how you frame digital preservation as a service rather than as “an added burden”. The idea of “seamless preservation” with no human intervention is a very appealing one to already burdened staff, but in reality workflows need to be supervised and maintained. To sell digital preservation, that extra work must therefore be perceived as something which adds value to collection material and the organisation. It is clear that physical preservation adds value to collections, but the argument for digital preservation can be a harder sell.

Catherine had, however, some encouraging comments on how we can attempt to turn advice about digital preservation into something which is perceived as value adding.  Being involved with and talking to staff early on in the design of new project proposals – rather than as an extra add on after processes are already in place – is an example of this.

Image by James Mooney

All in all, it has been a valuable and encouraging visit to the Parliamentary Archives. The DPOC fellows look forward to keeping in touch – particularly to hear more about the great work Parliamentary Archive have been doing to provide digital preservation training to staff!