Digital Preservation at Oxford Open Days

Oxford Fellow, Sarah, describes the DPOC team’s pop-up exhibition “Saving Digital,” held at the Radcliffe Science Library during Oxford Open Days #OxOpenDay. The post describes from the equipment and games the team showcased over the two days and some of the goals they had in mind for this outreach work.


On 27 June and 28 June, Oxford ran Open Days for prospective students. The city was alive with open doors and plenty of activity. It was the perfect opportunity for us to take our roadshow kit out and meet with prospective students with a pop-up exhibition called “Saving Digital”. The Radcliffe Science Library (RSL) on Parks Road kindly hosted the DPOC team and all of our obsolete media for two day in their lounge area.

The pop-up exhibition hosted at the RSL

We set up our table with a few goals in mind:

  • to educate prospective students about the rapid pace of technology and the concern about how we’re going to read digital data off them in the future (we educated a few parents as well!)
  • to speak with library and university staff about their digital dilemmas and what we at the digital preservation team could do about it
  • to raise awareness about the urgency and need of digital preservation in all of our lives and to inform more people about our project (#DP0C)

To achieve this, we first drew people in with two things: retro gaming and free stuff.

Last minute marketing to get people to the display. It worked!

Our two main games were the handheld game, Galaxy Invader 1000, and Frak! for the BBC Micro.

Frak! on the BBC Micro. The yellow handheld console to the right is Galaxy Invader 1000.

Galaxy Invader 1000 by CGL (1980) is a handheld game, which plays a version of Space Invaders. This game features a large multi-coloured display and 3 levels of skill. The whole game was designed to fit in 2 kilobytes of memory. 

Frak! (1984) was a game released for the BBC Micro in 1984 under the Aardvark software label. It was praised for excellent graphics and game play. In the side scrolling game, you play a caveman named Trogg. The aim of the game is to cross a series of platforms while avoiding dangers that include various monsters named Poglet and Hooter. Trogg is armed with a yo-yo for defence. 

Second, we gave them some digestible facts, both in poster form and by talking with them:

Saving Digital poster

Third, we filled the rest of the table with obsolete media and handheld devices from about the last forty years—just a small sample of what was available! This let them hold some of the media of the past, marvel over how little it could hold, but how much it could do for the time. And then we asked them how would they read the data off it today. That probably concerned parents more than their kids as several of them admitted to having important digital stuff either still on VHS or miniDV tapes, or on 3.5-inch disks! It got everyone thinking at least.

A lot of obsolete media all in one place.

Lastly, an enthusiastic team with some branded t-shirts made to emulate our most popular 1st generation badge, which was pink with a 3.5-inch disk in the middle. We gave away our last one during Open Days! But don’t worry, we have some great 2nd generation badges to collect now.

An enthusiastic team always helps. Especially if they are willing to demo the equipment.


A huge thank you to the RSL for hosting us for two days—we’ll be back on the 16th of July if you missed us and want to visit the exhibition! We’ll have a few extra retro games on hand and some more obsolete storage media!

Our poster was found on display in the RSL.